Manchester Animation Festival 2016 (Day 3)

The third and final day of Manchester Animation Festival! The stars of the show were, of course, the Ray Harryhausen puppets on display during the day. In the morning, John Walsh and Connor Heaney gave a talk on the lost treasures of Harryhausen and an insight into his world of stop-motion creature effects. Other highlights included the live recording of the Skwigly podcast, which included interviews with some of the filmmakers from the festival.

In between events I was able to watch the short film programme “Student Films 2,” my personal highlights were Ama by Emilie Almaida, Liang Huang, Mansoureh Kamari, Julie Robert, Juliette Peuportier and Tony Unser. Perched directed by Liam Harris and Mr Madila by Rory Waudby-Tolley which although I had seen before at a This Is Not a Cartoon screening a few months ago it’s still a fantastic and funny film.

Overall, this was a fantastic event to photograph and attend. I wish I could’ve stayed for the award ceremony right at the end but unfortunately, I had to set off.

I hope to come back next year and I hope anyone reading this gets the opportunity to attend next year also!

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Manchester Animation Festival 2016 (Day 2)

Day 2 of Manchester Animation Festival kicked off with a special virtual reality animated experience called HooDoo by the animation company BlueZoo who gave a masterclass later in the afternoon. There was also the fantastic “Women in Animation” panel discussing the representation of women in animated films (something right up my street as you may know) as well as loads of great screenings although unfortunately, I didn’t get to see any films on this day!

Above are my photos for day 2 of the festival.

You can keep up with the festival itself on Facebook and Twitter.

A Day at the London Film Festival.

On the 6th of October I jumped on the train to attend the BFI London Film Festival, I’d never attended before and was excited to see how it would compare to similar scale festivals I’ve been to previously. I had tickets to see 2 films I’ve been excited about months Amma Assante’s A United Kingdom and the first Non-Japanese collaboration from Studio Ghibli The Red Turtle both of which were conveniently screening at the big Odeon Cinema in Leicester Square. I got there ridiculously early (which won’t surprise anyone who knows me). My first screening of the day was at 11:30am, it happened to be the Gala Screening of the night before and they were packing up the rest of the red carpet and wall when I got there. So I waited outside the box office, picked up my tickets and was ready to begin.

A United Kingdomaunitedkingdom2

Set in the 1940s and starring David Oyelowo (Selma, Queen of Katwe) and Rosamund Pike (Gone Girl, Pride and Prejudice). A United Kingdom tells the story of the real-life marriage between Seretse Khama, Prince of Bechuanaland (now Botswana) and British office clerk Ruth Williams and the international uproar their union caused. I absolutely loved this film. It was emotional, funny and heartbreaking in places. It tackles feelings of identity, love, and prejudice from both countries involved. The film’s score compliments the sweeping romance of the film whilst the cinematography captures the two very different countries perfectly using colour and framing. This feels like a triumphant and culturally relevant film. Definitely, recommend!

The Red Turtletheredturtle
This wordless animation follows a man stranded on a desert island who is prevented from leaving by a mysterious giant red turtle. As I said previously, this is a collaboration with Studio Ghibli and french director Michael Dubok de Wit. For me, seeing the familiar logo of the studio at the start of the film filled me with emotion immediately. This is a very different animation style to the Japanese films made at the studio and Michael Dubok de Wit described the creative freedom he had working with them during the Q&A as an “adventure” for the both of them. The film itself was beautiful animated and simplistic which made up for it being slightly predictable in its story.

When asked at the Q&A why he chose for the film to have no dialogue he explained that he didn’t want the audience to know the nationality or cultural background of the character allowing him to be a blank canvas for the audience to project on. I think this worked perfectly in the context of the film and I really hope that Studio Ghibli does more collaborations in the future.

Overall, I have a great time and would love to go back next year for longer!  Did you attend the BFI London Film Festival? If so, what did you see?

Queer as Film.

queerasfilmOn Saturday the 28th of February my film “Translucent” was screened at the Queer as Film event in London. This was the first time the film had been shown outside of my University plus I did a Q&A afterwards. There were 7 short films shown in total all with a theme of LGBT.  There was a range of funny and sad films, some silly and others far more dark and serious. Queer as Film was founded in 2009 by Robert Gershinson and Craig Ford and was hosted by comedian Tom Allen.

The event was really great, laid back and had a  friendly, supportive atmosphere which made me slightly less nervous to do the Q&A after the screening! The other films shown were good, a particular favourite being “A Little bit Country” by Amy Coop which compared coming out as a country music fan to coming out as gay which was very funny and poignant.

For my film “Translucent” I got a really good response, and I’m very happy with how it went. I’m grateful to the people at Queer as Film for selecting it! Below is my Q&A.